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November is Men’s Health Awareness Month

November is Men’s Health Awareness Month

November is Men’s Health Awareness Month. Made popular by the annual event and hashtag #Movember, which involves growing mustaches during the month of November to raise awareness of men’s health issues, “Movember” is a mash-up of the word “mo” (slang for mustache in Australia) and November.

The men’s health charity event may have started down under, but it’s changing the face of men’s health awareness worldwide.

Whether you participate in Movember or not, it’s definitely a good time to check in, checkup, and take action for a longer, healthier life. This November, we’re focusing on three largely preventable causes of death in men: suicide, prostate cancer, and testicular cancer.

Suicide rates are higher for men. Seek and offer support.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), suicide is an alarming 3.7 times more common in men than women. Early recognition and support save lives. If you suspect a friend is feeling low, the acronym “ALEC” can help you spot potential warning signs of suicide:

  • Ask how he’s feeling.
  • Listen without interruption.
  • Encourage him to take action, such as visiting his primary care provider.
  • Check-in and follow up.


If you or a friend are facing suicidal thoughts, you don’t need to do it alone. For further support, call Crisis Support Services of Nevada at 1 (800) 273-8255 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1 (800) 273-8255.

If anyone is in immediate danger, call 911.

Carson Valley Medical Center offers Behavioral Health Services in an outpatient setting. For more information, please visit the Behavioral Health Services page on our website.

1 in 8 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Reduce your risk.

Like most cancers, age, race, and family history are risk factors. Research has shown that prostate cancer is more likely to be fatal in men who are overweight or obese. Staying physically active and eating plenty of colorful fruits and veggies and whole grains may reduce your risk. To learn more about prostate cancer prevention, visit the American Cancer Society website.

When prostate cancer is detected early, men have more treatment options and are less likely to die from the disease.

The American Cancer Society recommends primary care providers discuss prostate cancer screening with men:

  • Age 50, at average risk, and are expected to live 10+ more years
  • Age 45, with high risk, including African American men and men who have a father or brother diagnosed with prostate cancer before the age of 65.
  • Age 40, with very high risk, such as having more than one close relative diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Prostate screening is a simple blood draw that can be performed at the CVMC laboratory, which offers full-service testing services by full-time, board-certified pathologists and other staff members. The outpatient lab is open Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Community Wellness Lab Draws are offered daily. For more information on our Community Wellness Program, please visit the Community Wellness Program page on our website.

Testicular cancer is treatable, but you have to find it first.

The American Cancer Society says testicular cancer has been on the rise for several decades. Although it’s uncommon, it’s worth watching out for, especially for young and middle-aged men. 440 American men are expected to die from testicular cancer in 2021.

You can you reduce your risk by staying physically active, eating a healthy diet, and doing a monthly self-check to monitor your testes for changes.

Read more about tools to tackle testicular cancer on the Movember website.


If you do notice a new lump or painful sensation, set up an appointment with your primary care provider to get it checked out. CVMC primary care providers are currently accepting new patients, so call (775) 782-1550 to set up an appointment today, or visit our website to find your new primary care provider today.

We Care for You.

The best defense is a good offense. A recent survey revealed that ⅔ of men avoid visiting their primary care provider and that 37% of men withhold information from their doctor when they do. We understand that the potential of an unwanted diagnosis can be scary and being vulnerable with your doctor can be, well, uncomfortable.

The risks of waiting to seek treatment are worse.

All too often, patients delay seeking treatment until it is too late to treat a disease without serious intervention (or at all). Preventive care and regular check-ups with your primary healthcare provider can help you live a longer, healthier, happier life.

Compassionate, convenient care is available close to home through CVMC. Whether Men’s Health Awareness Month’s health initiatives hit home, or you need medical care for a separate issue, please call us at (775) 782-1550 to set up an appointment today, or visit our website to find your new primary care provider today.